State Representative

Drew Darby

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MEET DREW DARBY

Working for us

Drew is a lifelong West Texan, a native of San Angelo, and attended San Angelo public schools. Drew graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor of Business Administration, majoring in Finance and minoring in Accounting. He earned a Doctorate of Jurisprudence from the University of Texas and is a graduate of the Emerging Political Leaders Program at the Darden School of Business, University of Virginia.

ON THE ISSUES

TEXAS PRIORITIES

For far too long, legislators and big cities to our east have treated West Texas like nothing more than the place they get their energy, food, tax dollars, and water. West Texas isn’t a “piggy bank,” it’s where we live, work, and raise our families. Drew Darby, our state representative, watches out for West Texas.

THE LATEST

FROM THE CAMPAIGN

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14 hours ago
Drew Darby for Texas

During the Regular Session of the 88th Legislature, I had the privilege of contributing to the passage of groundbreaking legislation that will significantly enhance our state's infrastructure, combat the fentanyl crisis, ensure the safety of our children both online and in schools, and accomplish much more. While these priorities represent significant strides in strengthening our state, there is still more work ahead.

Today marked the commencement of the first special session in the Texas House, focusing on crucial issues such as property tax relief and bolstering border security measures.

I am pleased to share that the Texas House wasted no time in taking action by swiftly approving House Bill 1 and House Joint Resolution 1. These measures will result in a remarkable $17.6 billion in property tax relief, effectively reducing the school district tax rate by an additional 16.2 cents, marking the largest property tax cut in Texas history!

I was honored to cast my vote in support of these measures, as they are poised to bring much-needed relief to taxpayers. Now, it rests with the Texas Senate to usher these priorities to Governor Greg Abbott's desk for final approval.

Upon passage from the House, the governor issued the following statement:

“The Texas House is the only chamber that passed a property tax cut bill that is germane to the special session that I called to provide Texans with property tax relief,” said Governor Abbott. “It provides more cuts to property tax rates than any other proposal at this time. It is supported by the most respected tax think tank in the state, as well as more than 30 homeowner, consumer, and business groups across the state. I look forward to signing it when it reaches my desk."
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During the Regular Session of the 88th Legislature, I had the privilege of contributing to the passage of groundbreaking legislation that will significantly enhance our states infrastructure, combat the fentanyl crisis, ensure the safety of our children both online and in schools, and accomplish much more. While these priorities represent significant strides in strengthening our state, there is still more work ahead. 

Today marked the commencement of the first special session in the Texas House, focusing on crucial issues such as property tax relief and bolstering border security measures.

I am pleased to share that the Texas House wasted no time in taking action by swiftly approving House Bill 1 and House Joint Resolution 1. These measures will result in a remarkable $17.6 billion in property tax relief, effectively reducing the school district tax rate by an additional 16.2 cents, marking the largest property tax cut in Texas history! 

I was honored to cast my vote in support of these measures, as they are poised to bring much-needed relief to taxpayers. Now, it rests with the Texas Senate to usher these priorities to Governor Greg Abbotts desk for final approval.

Upon passage from the House, the governor issued the following statement: 

“The Texas House is the only chamber that passed a property tax cut bill that is germane to the special session that I called to provide Texans with property tax relief,” said Governor Abbott. “It provides more cuts to property tax rates than any other proposal at this time. It is supported by the most respected tax think tank in the state, as well as more than 30 homeowner, consumer, and business groups across the state. I look forward to signing it when it reaches my desk.

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Read HB43 #EliminatePropertyTax

Today we remember the brave men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice so that our beloved country remains the land of the free. God bless them and their families, and may their memory be honored today and every day. ... See MoreSee Less

Today we remember the brave men and women who paid the ultimate sacrifice so that our beloved country remains the land of the free. God bless them and their families, and may their memory be honored today and every day.

100 years ago today, in Reagan County, Santa Rita No. 1 roared to life with oil spewing over the top of the derrick into the countryside. This event would transform the Permian Basin into one of the most prolific oil fields in the world and forever shape our state and the University of Texas and Texas A&M Systems.

An excerpt from the book Santa Rita by Martin W. Schwettman states, "The Santa Rita made three flows on May 28, two on May 29, and on regularly each day for thirty-five or forty days. It flowed initially about 100 barrels of oil a day. Later it produced 200 barrels on the pump. The gravity of the oil was 38 degrees Baume. Though not a large well, it was the beginning, the prophecy of great things to come."

The name "Santa Rita" originated in New York when Frank T. Pickrell, who leased the land, was selling stock in the Texon Oil and Land Company to a group of Catholic women. Pickrell stated that the women became a little worried about the wisdom of their investment and consulted with their priest, who was also skeptical. The priest encouraged the women to invoke the aid of Santa Rita, the patron saint of the impossible.

As Pickrell was leaving New York, the ladies handed him an envelope containing a red rose blessed by the priest in the saint's name. The women asked him to take the rose back to Texas, climb to the top of the derrick, scatter the rose petals, and say, "I hereby christen thee Santa Rita." Pickrell faithfully followed instructions.

Santa Rita No. 1 was the first well drilled on University Lands, and the first royalty payment to the Permanent University Fund was made on August 24, 1923, for $516.53.

In 1940, under the leadership of the Texas State Historical Association, the Santa Rita rig was moved from its original site to the University of Texas campus in Austin, where it remains today. In 1990, almost sixty-seven years of production, the Santa Rita No. 1 was plugged.

The discovery was a pivotal moment in Texas history that undoubtedly reshaped West Texas. This session, I proudly introduced and passed House Concurrent Resolution 68, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the discovery of oil at Santa Rita No. 1. I am honored to represent Reagan County in the Texas House of Representatives.

God bless Texas, especially West Texas!

(Photo Credit: University of Texas)
... See MoreSee Less

100 years ago today, in Reagan County, Santa Rita No. 1 roared to life with oil spewing over the top of the derrick into the countryside. This event would transform the Permian Basin into one of the most prolific oil fields in the world and forever shape our state and the University of Texas and Texas A&M Systems. 

An excerpt from the book Santa Rita by Martin W. Schwettman states, The Santa Rita made three flows on May 28, two on May 29, and on regularly each day for thirty-five or forty days. It flowed initially about 100 barrels of oil a day. Later it produced 200 barrels on the pump. The gravity of the oil was 38 degrees Baume. Though not a large well, it was the beginning, the prophecy of great things to come. 

The name Santa Rita originated in New York when Frank T. Pickrell, who leased the land, was selling stock in the Texon Oil and Land Company to a group of Catholic women. Pickrell stated that the women became a little worried about the wisdom of their investment and consulted with their priest, who was also skeptical. The priest encouraged the women to invoke the aid of Santa Rita, the patron saint of the impossible. 

As Pickrell was leaving New York, the ladies handed him an envelope containing a red rose blessed by the priest in the saints name. The women asked him to take the rose back to Texas, climb to the top of the derrick, scatter the rose petals, and say, I hereby christen thee Santa Rita. Pickrell faithfully followed instructions.

Santa Rita No. 1 was the first well drilled on University Lands, and the first royalty payment to the Permanent University Fund was made on August 24, 1923, for $516.53. 

In 1940, under the leadership of the Texas State Historical Association, the Santa Rita rig was moved from its original site to the University of Texas campus in Austin, where it remains today. In 1990, almost sixty-seven years of production, the Santa Rita No. 1 was plugged. 

The discovery was a pivotal moment in Texas history that undoubtedly reshaped West Texas. This session, I proudly introduced and passed House Concurrent Resolution 68, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the discovery of oil at Santa Rita No. 1. I am honored to represent Reagan County in the Texas House of Representatives. 

God bless Texas, especially West Texas! 

(Photo Credit: University of Texas)

Comment on Facebook

Thank you for sharing! Quite interesting.

Neat

#EliminatePropertyTax

I loved reading this story. The well continues to help Texas. Thanks Drew for the information. 👍😍🇺🇸

Bernie Wayne Phillips

Very interesting!

Got a vile of crude from this well. Interesting stuff

Interesting bit on name of well.

Where is it on the campus? I don’t remember ever seeing it.

A very informative post!!

Amen

Just there this morning

Josh Osgood

🤘

David Lindsay, Moe Lindsay, thought maybe, y’all might be interested in this bit of Texas history.

What a magnificent view!

Great Story

Thanks for the info. Spent about 6 years in the Permian Basin in my younger years. Lots of memories.

Amen 🙏🏻

Still baffles me how a$m got a piece of that

I worked on the deepest well drilled at the time outside of Fort Stockton!!🤘🏼🤘🏼🤘🏼

Amazing!

"Making a Big Lake!"

Book written by my Uncle Martin Schwettmann 👍🏻

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